Jillian Michaels: “When you care more you train harder and eat better”

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On why she’s so committed to working out and being healthy:

I’m a 42-year-old. I still like skinny jeans. I still prefer a two-piece instead of a one-piece, but now I have two young kids. So for me, I want to be skiing down the mountain alongside my kids instead of waiting at the bottom for them. I want to see their children graduate from college. I want to meet my grandchildren’s children. These are my whys.

On aging and why she’s in better shape now than she was in her 20s:

I care more, and when you care more you train harder and eat better. People believe that aging is this slow descent into decrepitude. That’s not true. When people say, “Oh, I’m 40 now, and this is happening to me and that’s happening to me,” it’s the cumulative effect of years of neglect, which—by the way—can still be turned around.

On why she thinks there’s too much pressure on women to get back to their pre-pregnancy bodies:

I was just talking to someone who was breast-feeding and already on a diet. I was like, “Dude, you’ve got to chill. If you start dropping more than two pounds a week, you’re going to compromise your milk supply.” The reality is that you can bounce back better than ever, but time frames vary for everyone. Everybody and every pregnancy is different. If it takes you a year, who cares?

 

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Cindy Crawford: ‘I don’t need people pointing out I don’t look 20’

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On being criticized on Instagram for not looking like she did at age 20:

I don’t need everyone on Instagram pointing out that I don’t look the same way I did when I was 20. I know that. Sometimes when you’re in the public eye, it can be hard, and that’s where you kind of have to work on yourself. No matter what I do, I’m not going to look 20 or 30. I just want to look great for 50. I exercise, eat healthy and take really good care of my skin. There’s pressure on women to do the undoable, which is not age. But it’s about looking great for however old you are, regardless of what that number is.

Last year, Cindy raised a few eyebrows when she was quoted saying:

I always tease my daughter (14) – who everyone agrees, is a mini-me – and say ‘You have my old hair – I want it back!’ or, ‘You have my old legs – I want them back.’

Step Back in Time: Cindy in her 20s:

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Demi Lovato: “I don’t see anybody in any sort of squad that has a normal body”

Demi Lovato: “I don’t see anybody in any sort of squad that has a normal body”

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Demi Lovato recently opened up to Glamour Magazine about body image, the lack of normal bodies in Taylor Swift’s squad and feminism:

On the negative response to her “Body Say” images:

You don’t say anything, because you can never win. Whether they’re saying that you’re ugly, or that you’re a whore, or that you’re a bad role model, or something else, you’re never gonna win.

On exploring sexuality in her image and music:

We live in an imbalanced society when it comes to encouraging male sexuality and discouraging female sexuality. In 20 years I hope we’ll look back like, Wow, that’s how it used to be.

Question: You’ve said before, in regard to Taylor Swift, “Don’t brand yourself a feminist if you don’t do the work.” How do you see yourself doing the work?

Just speaking out. I’m not afraid to talk about the fact that women get paid less than men in the United States and how unfair that is. Talking about it at all is doing the work. And I think every woman does her part in some way. But I think in certain situations, certain people could be doing more if they’re going to claim that as part of their brand. To be honest, and this will probably get me in trouble, I don’t see anybody in any sort of squad that has a normal body. It’s kind of this false image of what people should look like. And what they should be like, and it’s not real.

Question: Well, there are many kinds of “normal” bodies. I think what you’re getting at is there’s just one type of body in that squad.

It’s not realistic. And I think that having a song and a video about tearing Katy Perry down, that’s not women’s empowerment. We all do things that aren’t, but I have to ask myself, Am I content with calling myself a feminist? Yes, because I speak out.

Question: Do things besides a busy schedule still trigger you?

Yeah, of course. Seeing cocaine in movies. I’ve never watched The Wolf of Wall Street. I can’t. I don’t like to go out to clubs, because I find myself seeing remnants of drugs in the bathroom. I did the Victoria’s Secret Swim Special, and being surrounded by supermodels’ bodies was triggering to me. I remember asking, “How do you maintain your figure?” Some said, “I really have to work at it.” Others said, “It’s genetics.” It was interesting to hear that it wasn’t through unhealthy [behaviors]. It was a great learning experience. I still felt sexy, having a different body than these women. I had Wilmer there, who loved my curves—that helped.

Taylor Swift’s squad that lacks normal bodies, according to Demi:

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Tracy Anderson’s Words, Then & Now

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THEN – Tracy on walking as exercise in April 2016:

We are wrapped in bubble wrap. We think that making it through the pain cave is putting our workout gear on and getting to class. Now, I’m not knocking any level of showing up, but I think many people are stuck in preschool with their bodies. Going for a walk is like going to preschool—but you could go to college, you could get your master’s degree.

NOW – Tracy on walking as exercise in September 2016:

I always approve walking as a really great cardiovascular workout to do. It’s something that people think is for the aging crowd or that it’s not really aggressive enough, and I completely disagree with that. It’s a really responsible form of exercise. One of the great things about walking is that it’s something that almost everybody can do. It’s something that is very healthy because it doesn’t have harsh impact on your joints. And even though you are doing the same movement over and over, you can change your speed, you can change your stride, you can change all different things to keep yourself engaged. You burn less calories running than walking if you aren’t able to run for very long or run very well. To really be effective and calorie-burning, you have to be able to work your body to where it’s working up a sweat, where it’s pushing into that zone of actually being optimized to be effective in the calorie-burning range, so it’s much better to go for a long and powerful walk than it is to go for a short run.

 

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Benji Madden: Cameron Diaz is ‘a modern day feminist’ who shares positivity

Benji Madden has a new extensive interview in Newsweek for the 20th anniversary of his band, Good Charlotte (with his twin brother, Joel). Good Charlotte returned from a multi-year hiatus to release a new album last week. I’m not too familiar with Benji and apart from the fact that he seems to be genuinely in love with and supportive of his wife, Cameron Diaz, I don’t have a strong opinion about him. A quick glance at our archives reminds me that he’s dated several famous women including Paris Hilton and Holly Madison and apart from hearing about his other occasional hookups, I haven’t heard a bad word about him in the 10 years I’ve run this site. No scandals, no paparazzi beat-downs, no DUIs. That’s really saying something. So he seems like a serial monogamist and a standup guy. He’s also very supportive of Cameron, and they’ve each gushed about each other on their social media and to the press. That’s all background to this interview, which just impressed me with how wise and thoughtful he sounds. I mean I don’t agree with him about Cameron Diaz, but he comes across extremely well.

On how the music industry can be hard on artists
My brother and I feel blessed to have survived and still have loving, connected relationships with each other, with our wives, with our family. We feel like: “Hey, there are a lot of artists who might be able to use our experiences.” We’ve been able to withstand a lot of things in the industry because we had each other. We feel protective of other artists.

This is not a business that is set up in favor of artists. It’s important for artists to value themselves—whatever that means. Everyone’s going to take that in a different way. If you don’t value yourself, you will be bought and sold.

On the public’s obsession with celebrity
I think it’s a very unhealthy trend that will eventually be broken when people realize how hollow it is for our minds, it’s very cancerous…it’s like fast food. Fast food companies are trending down, lots of places are going out of business. People figured out: “This is killing us, it’s f-king terrible.” The celebrity obsession is doing the same thing for our minds—it’s very hollow and I think that trend is going to break soon enough.

On how Cameron uses her platform for good
I’m extremely proud of what she uses her platform for. She just released The Longevity Book, and before that she had The Body Book [a lifestyle guide to diet and health], and she spent thousands of dollars doing all the research, to get information to share with women who don’t necessarily have the resources to get that information. She’s a modern day feminist—she wants to change the conversation that’s being had about women and ageing. With The Body Book, she wanted to share all this information she has gathered over the years with women so they can live happy, pain-free lives.

I’m proud of her because of what a light she is in a world where it would be so much easier to use that stage to promote products. But she’s using that platform she has to share positivity. It’s been one of the most inspirational things in my life watching a woman be so courageous…she’s got so much integrity. I’m a lucky guy that I get to experience that.

Calvin Harris believes Taylor Swift started up with Tom Hiddleston in February

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This weekend, The Sun had an interesting and insider-y story on Taylor Swift, Tom Hiddleston and Calvin Harris. Think back for a moment to the glory days of early June. When Taylor and Calvin first split up, most of us gossip-watchers knew that there be would drama, because Tay and Calvin are equally petty and juvenile. But back then, did we know that it would get THIS bad? Did we know that Calvin and Taylor’s teams would be sniping back and forth at each other over whether Taylor cheated, etc? I don’t think anyone could have predicted this. The gist of this Sun piece is that Team Calvin says Taylor was likely screwing around with Tom for months before they went public. Team Taylor says Calvin was a sh—ty boyfriend anyway, so what does any of it matter?

Before a flame war starts flaming, let me just say that I think both sides (Team Calvin and Team Swifty) were well-represented in this piece, meaning that both Calvin and Taylor’s PR people and friends are engaging a thorough tit-for-tat. It’s not a case of “poor Taylor, Calvin is being so mean!” Nor is it “poor Calvin, Taylor is so powerful!” They’re both fighting. They both care. They both have an axe to grind. I do think the fact that Calvin didn’t come to the Grammys with Taylor was the beginning of the end for their relationship. I also think that there was overlap between the “the end of Calvin and Taylor” and “the beginning of Tiddles.” And as I keep saying… Calvin and Taylor are so well-matched, it really is a shame they couldn’t make it work.

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Variety critic writes about Renee Zellweger’s face & now everybody’s mad

Variety critic writes about Renee Zellweger’s face & now everybody’s mad

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Last week, the second full-length trailer for Bridget Jones’s Baby dropped. I didn’t cover it because A) I didn’t think people would care and B) I found the second trailer even more depressing than the first trailer. While I am excited to see Renee Zellweger return to a celebrated and beloved role, as I see more of the plot, my excitement dies a little bit. I just think baby-daddy hijinks for a woman in her mid-to-late 40s is a bit much, honestly. Out of all the plot lines, they chose that? I understand that they’re basing it off Helen Fielding’s columns, but maybe they shouldn’t have waited so many years to make this one? Here’s the second trailer:

So, yes, I have some complaints. At the heart of those complaints is just plain old disappointment though: the first Bridget Jones movie is as close to perfect as possible. It is arguably one of the greatest romantic comedies of all time. Renee was so good in it that she got an Oscar nom! But 15 years later, we’re getting this mess. And when one critic – Variety’s Owen Gleiberman – expressed his disappointment, he got into a world of trouble. Gleiberman wrote a piece called “Renee Zellweger: If She No Longer Looks Like Herself, Has She Become a Different Actress?” You can read the piece here. It’s supposed to be a “think-piece” about how Zellweger has changed her face so drastically that she’s no longer believable as Bridget Jones, and this guy is personally offended by that. He goes on at length about the pressures of society, and how Zellweger used to be pretty in a normal, believable, girl-next-door sort of way but now she doesn’t look like herself because of her very noticeable plastic surgery and he just goes on and on about it.

So, obviously, Owen Gleiberman got slammed all over the place for being sexist and ageist. If we’re saying that this dude never would have written a long-winded, body-policing think-piece about how Russell Crowe is no longer believable as a leading man because of how HE looks and how HE is ageing, I can see that point, and I agree with it. That is sexist and ageist if we’re just going to go on and on about only the actresses. But… I also think that Gleiberman had a (albeit minor) point? If actors and actresses want to drastically change their looks through plastic surgery, so be it. Live and let live, and your body, your choice. But of course people are going to comment. And some of us even made similar comments when we first saw the set photos of Renee-as-Bridget, that “she doesn’t even look like Bridget” and “why does she look so different?” Of course none of us wrote long-winded hot-take think-pieces for Variety analyzing all of the many ways in which her face disappoints us personally.

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Photos courtesy of WENN, EW, Fame/Flynet.

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