Olympic Skier Lindsey Vonn: “Do I need to lose weight?”

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On feeling the pressure to look skinny:

“The more time I spent at these events, the more I began to feel that I didn’t quite fit in. It seemed like everyone was model-thin, with tiny waists and long willowy legs . . . I thought: ‘Should I not wear this dress? Do I need to lose weight if I want to stay socially relevant as an athlete?’”

… writes the professional athlete in her new book.

 

Kate Bosworth’s Classy Retro Look

Kate Bosworth’s Classy Retro Look

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33 year-old Kate Bosworth looked thin as always as she stepped out in a little black dress paired with a classy updo and black pumps for the #GiltLife launch party in New York.

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Halle Berry Brings Today’s Quotes

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Actually, my boyfriend at the time wanted a beauty pageant girlfriend. So he entered me and I got this letter in the mail saying, “You are a finalist in the Miss Team Ohio,” and I thought “Uh, what is this?” And then he told me, “Oh, by the way, I sent your prom picture in and now you have to go.” So I took my prom dress–It was quite taffeta, hoop skirt, off the shoulders, almost like I was getting married–and I went to this contest, thought it was fun, and I ended up winning. And once you start winning these things it’s like a snowball. And you have to go to the next one and if you when there you go to the next one, and I kept winning all the way until the Miss USA pageant where I did not win. I was first runner up to Christy Fichtner. And that ended my beauty pageant career.

 

Chloë Grace Moretz to Young Girl: “You’re enough”

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Her message to young women:

This year especially, I had to realize that it’s OK to ask for help— it’s OK to not know. As a young woman you feel like you really need to have everything figured out—but it’s all right to say, ‘I don’t know. I have absolutely no idea.’ Keep good people around you because positivity begets positivity. I learned that the hard way. Just try to keep your head above the water and don’t get caught up in all the trash. I think another thing that is really helpful for young women to understand is that you’re enough. You don’t need that dress, you don’t need that compliment, you don’t need that post on social media. You, within yourself, are enough. And, finally, don’t underestimate the power of friendship.

… says Chloe in Teen Vogue.

 

Tim Gunn: “Have you shopped retail for size 14-plus clothing? It’s a horribly insulting and demoralizing experience”

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On how fashion doesn’t love plus-sized women:

“I love the American fashion industry, but it has a lot of problems, and one of them is the baffling way it has turned its back on plus-size women. It’s a puzzling conundrum. The average American woman now wears between a size 16 and a size 18, according to new research from Washington State University. There are 100 million plus-size women in America, and, for the past three years, they have increased their spending on clothes faster than their straight-size counterparts. There is money to be made here ($20.4 billion, up 17 percent from 2013). But many designers — dripping with disdain, lacking imagination or simply too cowardly to take a risk — still refuse to make clothes for them.”

On what designers think:

“I’ve spoken to many designers and merchandisers about this. The overwhelming response is, “I’m not interested in her.” Why? “I don’t want her wearing my clothes.” Why? “She won’t look the way that I want her to look.” They say the plus-size woman is complicated, different and difficult, that no two size 16s are alike. Some haven’t bothered to hide their contempt. “No one wants to see curvy women” on the runway, Karl Lagerfeld, head designer of Chanel, said in 2009. Plenty of mass retailers are no more enlightened: Under the tenure of chief executive Mike Jeffries, Abercrombie & Fitch sold nothing larger than a size 10, with Jeffries explaining that “we go after the attractive, all-American kid. This a design failure and not a customer issue. There is no reason larger women can’t look just as fabulous as all other women. The key is the harmonious balance of silhouette, proportion and fit, regardless of size or shape. Designs need to be reconceived, not just sized up; it’s a matter of adjusting proportions. The textile changes, every seam changes. Done right, our clothing can create an optical illusion that helps us look taller and slimmer. Done wrong, and we look worse than if we were naked.”

On the fact that it is depressing to shop while plus-sized:

“Have you shopped retail for size 14-plus clothing? Based on my experience shopping with plus-size women, it’s a horribly insulting and demoralizing experience. Half the items make the body look larger, with features like ruching, box pleats and shoulder pads. Pastels and large-scale prints and crazy pattern-mixing abound, all guaranteed to make you look infantile or like a float in a parade. Adding to this travesty is a major department-store chain that makes you walk under a marquee that reads “WOMAN.” What does that even imply? That a “woman” is anyone larger than a 12, and everyone else is a girl? It’s mind-boggling.”

On how plus-size collections are all dated:

“Despite the huge financial potential of this market, many designers don’t want to address it. It’s not in their vocabulary. Today’s designers operate within paradigms that were established decades ago, including anachronistic sizing. (Consider the fashion show: It hasn’t changed in more than a century.) But this is now the shape of women in this nation, and designers need to wrap their minds around it. I profoundly believe that women of every size can look good. But they must be given choices. Separates — tops, bottoms — rather than single items like dresses or jumpsuits always work best for the purpose of fit. Larger women look great in clothes skimming the body, rather than hugging or cascading. There’s an art to doing this. Designers, make it work.”

… says Tim.

Emily Ratajkowski: ‘Wanting attention is genderless. It’s human’

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On the fact that people call her an ‘attention whore’:

“It’s absurd to think that desire for attention doesn’t drive both women and men. Why are women scrutinized for it more, then? And if a woman dresses up because she does want attention, male or otherwise, does that make her guilty of something? Or less “serious”? Our society doesn’t question men’s motivations for taking their shirt off, or shaving, or talking about politics—nor should it. Wanting attention is genderless. It’s human.

“Often it’s men propelling these acts of sexism, but women discount one another too: Think about how many times you’ve heard a woman say about another woman, ‘Oh, she’s just doing that for attention.’ We’ve internalized this trope. Our society tells women we can’t be, say, sexy and confident and opinionated about politics. This would allow us too much power. Instead our society asks us to declare and defend our motivations, which makes us second-guess them, all while men do what they please without question… The truth is that both groups want to be noticed. Yet we view a man’s desire for attention as a natural instinct; with a woman, we label her a narcissist.”

… says Emily in Glamour.

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Gigi Hadid’s Latest Looks

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Visibly slimmer Gigi Hadid was spotted on different occasions this week, rocking everything from plunging necklines to glittery dresses and navy overalls.

Which outfit do you like best on this young supermodel?

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