Chrissy Teigen on Posing in Bikinis: “That’s how I feel the most uncomfortable”

3B81C37400000578-4046944-_I_think_some_men_are_scared_of_feminists_because_they_think_the-a-49_1482123696808 - Chrissy Teigen on Posing in Bikinis: "That’s how I feel the most uncomfortable"

On never feeling like a bombshell and not believing she had a womanly figure:

I always felt like a bit of a tomboy, and I never looked at my body as particularly sexual — I wasn’t a curvy girl.

On how she looks totally different and curvier now, after having a baby:

But to be able to see my body afterwards, and of course you get, like, hips. Finally, for the first time, I feel like I have a bit more of a womanly figure … I think you just feel really feminine.

On how she’s most uncomfortable when modeling bikinis:

‘I’d much rather shoot completely naked than in a swimsuit. It’s just always been my thing. I’ve never been much of a beach girl. I grew up in Washington — it’s freezing in that ocean. So it’s out of my comfort zone, and it’s the craziest thing that I’m probably most known for Sports Illustrated, when that’s how I feel the most uncomfortable.’

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Demi Lovato: “I don’t see anybody in any sort of squad that has a normal body”

Demi Lovato: “I don’t see anybody in any sort of squad that has a normal body”

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Demi Lovato recently opened up to Glamour Magazine about body image, the lack of normal bodies in Taylor Swift’s squad and feminism:

On the negative response to her “Body Say” images:

You don’t say anything, because you can never win. Whether they’re saying that you’re ugly, or that you’re a whore, or that you’re a bad role model, or something else, you’re never gonna win.

On exploring sexuality in her image and music:

We live in an imbalanced society when it comes to encouraging male sexuality and discouraging female sexuality. In 20 years I hope we’ll look back like, Wow, that’s how it used to be.

Question: You’ve said before, in regard to Taylor Swift, “Don’t brand yourself a feminist if you don’t do the work.” How do you see yourself doing the work?

Just speaking out. I’m not afraid to talk about the fact that women get paid less than men in the United States and how unfair that is. Talking about it at all is doing the work. And I think every woman does her part in some way. But I think in certain situations, certain people could be doing more if they’re going to claim that as part of their brand. To be honest, and this will probably get me in trouble, I don’t see anybody in any sort of squad that has a normal body. It’s kind of this false image of what people should look like. And what they should be like, and it’s not real.

Question: Well, there are many kinds of “normal” bodies. I think what you’re getting at is there’s just one type of body in that squad.

It’s not realistic. And I think that having a song and a video about tearing Katy Perry down, that’s not women’s empowerment. We all do things that aren’t, but I have to ask myself, Am I content with calling myself a feminist? Yes, because I speak out.

Question: Do things besides a busy schedule still trigger you?

Yeah, of course. Seeing cocaine in movies. I’ve never watched The Wolf of Wall Street. I can’t. I don’t like to go out to clubs, because I find myself seeing remnants of drugs in the bathroom. I did the Victoria’s Secret Swim Special, and being surrounded by supermodels’ bodies was triggering to me. I remember asking, “How do you maintain your figure?” Some said, “I really have to work at it.” Others said, “It’s genetics.” It was interesting to hear that it wasn’t through unhealthy [behaviors]. It was a great learning experience. I still felt sexy, having a different body than these women. I had Wilmer there, who loved my curves—that helped.

Taylor Swift’s squad that lacks normal bodies, according to Demi:

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Benji Madden: Cameron Diaz is ‘a modern day feminist’ who shares positivity

Benji Madden has a new extensive interview in Newsweek for the 20th anniversary of his band, Good Charlotte (with his twin brother, Joel). Good Charlotte returned from a multi-year hiatus to release a new album last week. I’m not too familiar with Benji and apart from the fact that he seems to be genuinely in love with and supportive of his wife, Cameron Diaz, I don’t have a strong opinion about him. A quick glance at our archives reminds me that he’s dated several famous women including Paris Hilton and Holly Madison and apart from hearing about his other occasional hookups, I haven’t heard a bad word about him in the 10 years I’ve run this site. No scandals, no paparazzi beat-downs, no DUIs. That’s really saying something. So he seems like a serial monogamist and a standup guy. He’s also very supportive of Cameron, and they’ve each gushed about each other on their social media and to the press. That’s all background to this interview, which just impressed me with how wise and thoughtful he sounds. I mean I don’t agree with him about Cameron Diaz, but he comes across extremely well.

On how the music industry can be hard on artists
My brother and I feel blessed to have survived and still have loving, connected relationships with each other, with our wives, with our family. We feel like: “Hey, there are a lot of artists who might be able to use our experiences.” We’ve been able to withstand a lot of things in the industry because we had each other. We feel protective of other artists.

This is not a business that is set up in favor of artists. It’s important for artists to value themselves—whatever that means. Everyone’s going to take that in a different way. If you don’t value yourself, you will be bought and sold.

On the public’s obsession with celebrity
I think it’s a very unhealthy trend that will eventually be broken when people realize how hollow it is for our minds, it’s very cancerous…it’s like fast food. Fast food companies are trending down, lots of places are going out of business. People figured out: “This is killing us, it’s f-king terrible.” The celebrity obsession is doing the same thing for our minds—it’s very hollow and I think that trend is going to break soon enough.

On how Cameron uses her platform for good
I’m extremely proud of what she uses her platform for. She just released The Longevity Book, and before that she had The Body Book [a lifestyle guide to diet and health], and she spent thousands of dollars doing all the research, to get information to share with women who don’t necessarily have the resources to get that information. She’s a modern day feminist—she wants to change the conversation that’s being had about women and ageing. With The Body Book, she wanted to share all this information she has gathered over the years with women so they can live happy, pain-free lives.

I’m proud of her because of what a light she is in a world where it would be so much easier to use that stage to promote products. But she’s using that platform she has to share positivity. It’s been one of the most inspirational things in my life watching a woman be so courageous…she’s got so much integrity. I’m a lucky guy that I get to experience that.

‘Ghostbusters’ opened at the box office with $46 million: did you love it or hate it?

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I was looking forward to seeing the lady-version of Ghostbusters, mostly because I love the combo of Melissa McCarthy + director Paul Feig, and I think Kate McKinnon is one of the funniest people working today. I went to see it on a lazy Sunday afternoon, and about half-way through the film, I realized that it really wasn’t that funny. Ghostbusters has some giggle-worthy lines and some charm and McKinnon in particular was really trying her damnedest to bring some lightness and quirk to the movie, but even the combined talents of these funny women couldn’t save a clunky script. Those were the biggest issues: pacing, and a script that needed a few more rewrites. They spent too much time earnestly building the world of the “modern” Ghostbusters and there were so many opportunities for some tongue-in-cheek cultural references, anything to shorthand the process and move along the action, but it just didn’t happen.

Which isn’t to say that I think it’s a bad movie. It’s not, and if you’re in the mood for something light and silly, I would recommend it. It’s harmless and there are some funny lines and good moments. I feel like Kristen Wiig and Melissa McCarthy’s comedic talents were oddly underutilized as they both tried to play the straight-man to varying degrees. Leslie Jones’ Patty was brought into the story too late (pacing issues, I’m telling you). Chris Hemsworth’s character was the victim of messy writing too, and it felt like they couldn’t decide how stupid they wanted him to be, so his level of intelligence kept changing scene-to-scene.

I’m well aware that there is a Battle of the Sexes happening around this film and around the reviews of the film. I was prepared to go to war and rip apart the misogynistic criticism of the film. But after seeing it, the most feminist thing I can say is that the leading ladies were trying and the film’s flaws are not their fault. The fault lies with Paul Feig and Katie Dippold, the co-writers of the clunky script.

As for the box office, Sony predicted that it would make between $40-50 million opening weekend, and it performed as expected. Early reports on Sunday put the figure at something like $46 million. It came in second behind The Secret Life of Pets, which… let’s face it, is a massive, crowd-pleasing family film. The problem was that Ghostbusters was TOO scary for really little kids and not funny enough to have box office longevity. It cost $144 million to make Ghostbusters, and I’m sure that the film will break even and likely make the studio some money. But as many analysts pointed out, that might not be good enough. Ghostbusters didn’t need to perform at expectations, it needed to exceed expectations to be considered a “success.” You can read more analysis here.

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Jennifer Aniston: Gloria Steinem ‘taught me about feminism, it’s just about equality’

Jennifer Aniston: Gloria Steinem ‘taught me about feminism, it’s just about equality’

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Jennifer Aniston has never said anything stupid about feminism. Since questions about feminism have been popular with entertainment journalists for the past few years, Aniston has been asked about her feminism several times, and she always maintains that yes, she is a feminist and no, she has no problem identifying that way. There’s no word-game about “humanism.” There’s no “but I like boys, thus I can’t be a feminist!” Well, as part of her People Magazine “Most Beautiful” cover, Aniston answered a lot of questions about different things, including feminism. And she cites Gloria Steinem as the person who taught her about feminism. She also talks about skinny jeans!

Jennifer’s biggest beauty icon is Gloria Steinem. “I’ve always thought Gloria is quite stunning for many, many reasons besides her exterior. She’s taught me about feminism. There was a time when I was like, ‘I’m not quite sure I understand what this is?’ And she’s like, ‘It’s very simple: it’s just about equality. That’s all it is.’ She’s just taught me – have you seen her HBO documentary? I’ve seen it like eight times. She’s just a very beautiful, strong woman.”

What Justin Theroux likes to see her wear: “Well, let me tell you. I think I’m pretty much the same but he really enjoys me in a skinny jean, which I loathe. But I think I have more skinny jeans these days than normal.”

How she influenced Justin’s wardrobe: “Color! Not just black. It’s quite adorable.”

What she’s learned about love: “Oh it comes in all shapes and sizes. It’s something to be taken care of and cherished. And paid attention to. It’s a blessing.”

[From People Magazine]

First, the skinny jeans… I’m right there with her. This is the most I’ve ever agreed with Jennifer Aniston. I LOATHE skinny jeans. And she’s right to dislike them too: she looks much cuter in a straight-leg or even a boot-cut jean. But of course Justin likes the skinny jeans – he even loves to wear his own skinny jeans.

As for the feminism stuff… I think Jennifer could do much better than Gloria Steinem when it comes to feminist role models, but this is fine. She and Steinem are friends in real life, and I appreciate how straight-forward Aniston is being with the feminism questions.

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Photos courtesy of People Magazine, WENN.

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Jennifer Lopez: Dancers are better in bed, ‘musicians are too self-absorbed’

Jennifer Lopez: Dancers are better in bed, ‘musicians are too self-absorbed’

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Jennifer Lopez’s W Magazine profile just gave me the perfect term for why I love her so much: she is “the people’s diva.” Like, the people’s princess, only in multi-hyphenate diva form. Anyway, I sort of hate Jennifer’s W Magazine editorial – you can see the slideshow here. It’s sort of awful, and they made Jennifer wear a terrible blonde mullet wig in half the pics. As for the interview, it’s longer than most W Mag profiles. It reads like a day-in-the-life piece, and Jennifer is really, really busy. You can read the full piece here, and here are some highlights:

The people’s diva: “I’ve been in the grind and the game for a long time. At a certain point, people respect you when they see you fall down and get back up. The more you’re in this life, the more they celebrate your triumphs. When it comes to work, I never get tired. But with personal failures, I have thought, This is too hard. When my marriage ended, it was not easy to find forgiveness. It wasn’t the dream that I had hoped for, and it would have been easier to fan the flames of resentment, disappointment, and anger. But Marc is the father of my children [8-year-old twins], and that’s never going away. So, I have to work to make things right. And that is, by far, the hardest work I do.”

She’s fine-boned: “When I first came to Los Angeles, someone told me I would be a star because of my tiny ankles and wrists. They said that was the key to it all.”

She’s constantly being swarmed by fans: “It’s been like that since Selena. I never thought about fame until then. After that film, I would have panic attacks. I remember walking down the street, and someone yelled, ‘Jennifer!’ and I didn’t know who it was. I ran home. From that point forward, I realized I couldn’t be alone in public. I don’t think I’ve been alone on the street in over 20 years.”

Who is better in bed: “Last time I was here, they asked me who is better in bed—dancers, musicians, or actors? I said, ‘Dancers!’ Musicians are too self-absorbed. They are too concerned with themselves to be great in bed.”

On Marc Anthony: “I hung in there for seven years. I knew very quickly that it wasn’t the right thing.”

On Casper Smart: “We got together and broke up and are now together again. I still think about getting married and having that long life with someone. I love the movie The Notebook. A dream of mine is to grow old with someone.”

On being more accessible after her stint on American Idol: “It has been easier. People may now think I’m ‘nice,’ but they still act surprised when I’m smart. It’s a man’s world, and, truly, people in a business setting do not value a woman as much as a man. I feel like I’m constantly having to prove myself. If a man does one thing well, people immediately say he’s a genius. Women have to do something remarkable over and over and over. And, even then, they get questions about their love life. People underestimate me. They always have, and maybe that’s for the best. It’s fun to prove them wrong.”

[From W Magazine]

I do think J.Lo is smart… in almost every area of her life. She’s dumb in love, but smart everywhere else. And she’s right about people undervaluing her simply because she’s a woman, just as she’s right about constantly being underestimated. I love the bit about her thin ankles and wrists, I love the shade she has for Marc Anthony and I’m absolutely astonished that she hasn’t been alone in public in 20 years. She’s also wrong about dancers being the best lovers – swimmers are obviously the best lovers!

Meanwhile, there’s one thing I’d like to mention – last week, there was a controversy about J.Lo’s new single, “Ain’t Your Mama.” The song is awful, full-stop. But it was written by Meghan Trainor, and there were widespread reports that the track had been “produced” by Dr. Luke. Jennifer got a lot of online hate and shade for that. But E! News reported that Trainor had written the song several years back and her version was produced by Dr. Luke back then, before Kesha’s lawsuit. Then Trainor gave the song to J.Lo and J.Lo didn’t know Dr. Luke had ever had his fingerprints on it. Trainor confirmed that version of events this week, calling the backlash against Jennifer “ridiculous” and “not fair on her, not at all.”

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Photos courtesy of W Magazine.

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Thanks to Cele Bitchy

Emma Watson needs a better explanation for her Lancome skin-whitening ads

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Several years back, Emma Watson got a lucrative beauty contract with Lancome. She became one of their “faces,” and she appeared in print ads for many different Lancome products. Her contract is done at this point, and I have no idea if Lancome simply didn’t renew it or if Emma just didn’t want to be in their advertising anymore. But this week, people started discussing a print ad from 2013. The print ad (seen above) features Emma as the “face” of a skin-whitening Lancome product being sold in Asia. As you can imagine, the reaction was really, really bad. People have been itching to write off Emma as just another non-intersectional white feminist, and this gave them a perfect opportunity.

Beauty companies have long sold “skin lightening” products in countries with large (or nearly exclusive) populations of non-white women. Lancome is not the first nor will they be the last. Colorism, racism and the white-dominated hierarchy of beauty standards all come into play when we talk about skin lightening. We’ve talked about it before too, with Freida Pinto talking openly about her disgust for Indian society’s obsession with getting lighter skin. Anyway, the conversation centered around Emma and how she’s basically Peak White Feminism because she has profited from selling this bulls—t. So Emma’s publicist came out and this was literally the only statement made.

“I cannot comment on my client’s previous contractual arrangements with Lancôme. However, my client no longer participates in advertising beauty products, which do not always reflect the diverse beauty of all women.”

[Via People]

If it sounds like Emma’s people are sort of throwing Lancome under the bus, that’s because I think they are. I also think there’s a very real possibility that Emma’s images were used by Lancome for skin-whitening products without her explicit or implicit endorsement. Oh, and a Lancome representative told People:

“Blanc Expert was created by Lancôme 20 years ago. It helps brighten, even skin tone, and provides a healthy looking complexion. This kind of product, proposed by every brand, is an essential part of Asian women’s beauty routines.”

[Via People]

That pisses me off more than Emma’s rep’s statement. Skin-lightening products are not now and never have been an “essential” part of Asian women’s beauty routines and f—k you very much for saying so, Lancome.

As for Emma and white feminism… I find Emma less harmful than someone like Lena Dunham, honestly. I think Emma is trying and she’s attempting to educate herself beyond the narrow feminist beliefs she held just a few years ago. Does she deserve some backlash? Sure. Does she owe her fans a better explanation of why her image ended up on skin-whitening ads? Yes. But Lancome is the villain here, make no mistake.

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