Tracee Ellis Ross: “I am small for people and big for an actress”

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44 year-old Tracee Ellis Ross, who stars in Black-ish, recently opened up to People Magazine about weight fluctuations, style and not being Hollywood thin.

The full story from People:

“I’ve always been connected to the narrative of clothing,” she says. “My mom taught me that you can spend money on nice things if you’re going to use them. For example, I have an Alexander McQueen jacket that I wear with everything, even sweatpants.”

One of the things she has also learned over the years is stop obsessing over her size despite not being Hollywood thin.

“You know, I am not a sample size,” she says. “I am not a model size. I am small for people and big for an actress. My weight fluctuates a lot and I move with it. It is what it is. That’s why I try not to have a relationship with the size that I am.

And she deals with the change in her own unique way. “I actually own my favorite jeans in three sizes—28, 29 and 30,” she explains.

“Depending on how I feel, I always start with the big ones and if I get to go down, great,” she says. “It’s the same thing with dresses and clothing. I want to wear something that makes me feel gorgeous, not that makes me feel self-conscious about my body. Hiding insecurities or putting attention on the stuff that feels good is really the key…”

Ultimately, though, when it comes to picking out her looks, she says “there’s no real method to my madness.” All she does, she says, is “ask what is the best thing out of my closet or the best thing on the rack that makes me feel good and fits.”

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Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher Welcome Second Child!

Congratulations are very much in order for Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher.

The beloved couple has welcomed its second child into the world!

Hooray! Huzzah! So totally awesome, right?

Mila Kunis and Ashton Kutcher: Go Dodgers!

A representative for the actress and actor has confirmed that Kunis gave birth to a boy on November 30, although that is the only detail made known to the public at the moment.

We’ll let you know as soon as a name and/or any measurement intel is release.

The newborn joins two-year old sister Wyatt Isabelle as offspring of Kunis and Kutcher, who have done an admirable job of keeping their first child shielded from the spotlight.

Good luck finding photos of Wyatt anywhere online.

It’s almost as if Kunis and Kutcher care more about their little girl’s privacy and well-being than any attention or money they could earn off her existence.

Weird, right?

It’s safe to assume this will also be the case for the couple’s son.

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But while we don’t know a great deal about their kids, we do know that Kunis and Kutcher positively adore parenthood.

“The one topic of conversation we had even prior to ever having kids was always, ‘How do you raise a child to not be an asshole?’ ” Kunis said in August, adding:

“It’s a matter of teaching them from a very early age that, you know, ‘Mommy and Daddy may have a dollar, but you’re poor.'”

There was also the time Kutcher appeared opposite Ellen DeGeneres and simply gushed over Kunis as a mother. And we mean GUSHED.

“She’s the greatest mom I can’t even… like I go to work every day and I come home and she’s like perfect. And it just seems like everything went amazing,” the actor said two years ago.

“And I know that something probably didn’t go amazing, but she never tells… it’s unbelievable. She’s incredible.”

Kutcher and Kunis have also drawn praise for not hiring a nanny to help child rear, a decision Kutcher explained in that same interview thusly:

“We just want to know our kid,. We want to be the people that know what to do when the baby’s crying to make the baby not cry anymore.

“We want to know, like when she makes a little face or something we want to be emotionally in touch with her and I think the only way to do that is by being the one who’s there.”

Such a simple way of putting it, and yet such a spot-on explanation.

View Slideshow: Celebrities Who Welcomed Babies in 2016

Kunis and Kutcher got married in July of 2015, months after becoming first-time parents.

They confirmed that they were expecting again in June, with Kutcher spilling the gender beans during a chat this fall with Savanna Guthrie on NBC.

“I’m a little terrified to be honest,” Kutcher admitted to The Today Show host, smiling and confessing: “It’s intensely scary.”

Two kids instead of one? We’re sure it is. That’s, like, twice as many children as they had before. Talk about a challenge!

As for the name of their son?

Go ahead and take a guess.

As for photos of their son?

Do not go ahead and hold your breath awaiting some to be released. That would be a dangerous game to play.

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Tim Gunn: “Have you shopped retail for size 14-plus clothing? It’s a horribly insulting and demoralizing experience”

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On how fashion doesn’t love plus-sized women:

“I love the American fashion industry, but it has a lot of problems, and one of them is the baffling way it has turned its back on plus-size women. It’s a puzzling conundrum. The average American woman now wears between a size 16 and a size 18, according to new research from Washington State University. There are 100 million plus-size women in America, and, for the past three years, they have increased their spending on clothes faster than their straight-size counterparts. There is money to be made here ($20.4 billion, up 17 percent from 2013). But many designers — dripping with disdain, lacking imagination or simply too cowardly to take a risk — still refuse to make clothes for them.”

On what designers think:

“I’ve spoken to many designers and merchandisers about this. The overwhelming response is, “I’m not interested in her.” Why? “I don’t want her wearing my clothes.” Why? “She won’t look the way that I want her to look.” They say the plus-size woman is complicated, different and difficult, that no two size 16s are alike. Some haven’t bothered to hide their contempt. “No one wants to see curvy women” on the runway, Karl Lagerfeld, head designer of Chanel, said in 2009. Plenty of mass retailers are no more enlightened: Under the tenure of chief executive Mike Jeffries, Abercrombie & Fitch sold nothing larger than a size 10, with Jeffries explaining that “we go after the attractive, all-American kid. This a design failure and not a customer issue. There is no reason larger women can’t look just as fabulous as all other women. The key is the harmonious balance of silhouette, proportion and fit, regardless of size or shape. Designs need to be reconceived, not just sized up; it’s a matter of adjusting proportions. The textile changes, every seam changes. Done right, our clothing can create an optical illusion that helps us look taller and slimmer. Done wrong, and we look worse than if we were naked.”

On the fact that it is depressing to shop while plus-sized:

“Have you shopped retail for size 14-plus clothing? Based on my experience shopping with plus-size women, it’s a horribly insulting and demoralizing experience. Half the items make the body look larger, with features like ruching, box pleats and shoulder pads. Pastels and large-scale prints and crazy pattern-mixing abound, all guaranteed to make you look infantile or like a float in a parade. Adding to this travesty is a major department-store chain that makes you walk under a marquee that reads “WOMAN.” What does that even imply? That a “woman” is anyone larger than a 12, and everyone else is a girl? It’s mind-boggling.”

On how plus-size collections are all dated:

“Despite the huge financial potential of this market, many designers don’t want to address it. It’s not in their vocabulary. Today’s designers operate within paradigms that were established decades ago, including anachronistic sizing. (Consider the fashion show: It hasn’t changed in more than a century.) But this is now the shape of women in this nation, and designers need to wrap their minds around it. I profoundly believe that women of every size can look good. But they must be given choices. Separates — tops, bottoms — rather than single items like dresses or jumpsuits always work best for the purpose of fit. Larger women look great in clothes skimming the body, rather than hugging or cascading. There’s an art to doing this. Designers, make it work.”

… says Tim.

Prince Harry admits he didn’t talk about his mother’s death until he was 28

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It does feel like I’ve been ignoring Prince Harry, right? I didn’t mean to. It’s just that he’s so consistently awesome these days, and I feel like sometimes you guys might be tired of Honking For Harry. So, what has Harry been up to recently? He’s doing consistent events every week, but he’s not always getting attention and coverage for the events. Over the weekend, he hosted a barbecue for Heads Together, the mental health umbrella organization he started with William and Kate. William and Kate did not attend the BBQ, even though it went down at Kensington Palace. Harry spent a lot of time with mental health care providers and people struggling with mental health issues. Harry even spoke about how he wish he had started talking about his mother’s death much sooner.

Prince Harry has revealed that he regrets ‘not talking’ about the death of his mother Princess Diana for much of his life. Speaking with former football star Rio Ferdinand, who lost his wife to cancer last year, Harry, 31, discussed bereavement at a Kensington Palace barbecue for mental health campaign group Heads Together. The young royal discussed the impact the Princess of Wales’ death in 1997, when Harry was 12, has had on him when asked by Ferdinand how he coped with the loss.

The prince admitted that it was only three years ago that he began to open up about how he felt about losing his mother, saying he didn’t speak about Diana’s death ‘for the first 28 years of my life.’ He said he’d come to realise that talking was the key: ‘It is OK to suffer, but as long as you talk about it. It is not a weakness. Weakness is having a problem and not recognising it and not solving that problem. A lot of people think if you’ve got a job, if you’ve got financial security, if you’ve got a family, you’ve got a house, all that sort of stuff, everyone seems to think that is all you need and you are absolutely fine to deal with stuff.’

‘It is very easy for someone to look at someone like Rio Ferdinand and say, “You get paid all the money in the world, you are a successful footballer, you have fast cars.” But at the end of the day his wife was snatched from him at an early stage of his life with her. So of course he is going to suffer, it doesn’t matter if he has an amazing job.’

The prince said the ‘key message’ is that ‘anyone can suffer from mental health problems, whether you’re a member of the Royal Family, whether you’re a soldier, whether you’re a sports star, whether you’re a team sport, individual sport, whether you’re a white van driver, whether you’re a mother, father, a child, it doesn’t really matter. What you’ve had to go through in your day, week, year, (the) experience you’ve had – whether it’s losing a parent, whether it’s depression, whether it’s anxiety, whatever it is – you are actually unbelievably similar to each other in the way you have to deal with it.’

 

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“Kristen Stewart & Alicia Cargile had a little public makeout session” links

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Kristen Stewart made out with Alicia Cargile.

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‘Ghostbusters’ opened at the box office with $46 million: did you love it or hate it?

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I was looking forward to seeing the lady-version of Ghostbusters, mostly because I love the combo of Melissa McCarthy + director Paul Feig, and I think Kate McKinnon is one of the funniest people working today. I went to see it on a lazy Sunday afternoon, and about half-way through the film, I realized that it really wasn’t that funny. Ghostbusters has some giggle-worthy lines and some charm and McKinnon in particular was really trying her damnedest to bring some lightness and quirk to the movie, but even the combined talents of these funny women couldn’t save a clunky script. Those were the biggest issues: pacing, and a script that needed a few more rewrites. They spent too much time earnestly building the world of the “modern” Ghostbusters and there were so many opportunities for some tongue-in-cheek cultural references, anything to shorthand the process and move along the action, but it just didn’t happen.

Which isn’t to say that I think it’s a bad movie. It’s not, and if you’re in the mood for something light and silly, I would recommend it. It’s harmless and there are some funny lines and good moments. I feel like Kristen Wiig and Melissa McCarthy’s comedic talents were oddly underutilized as they both tried to play the straight-man to varying degrees. Leslie Jones’ Patty was brought into the story too late (pacing issues, I’m telling you). Chris Hemsworth’s character was the victim of messy writing too, and it felt like they couldn’t decide how stupid they wanted him to be, so his level of intelligence kept changing scene-to-scene.

I’m well aware that there is a Battle of the Sexes happening around this film and around the reviews of the film. I was prepared to go to war and rip apart the misogynistic criticism of the film. But after seeing it, the most feminist thing I can say is that the leading ladies were trying and the film’s flaws are not their fault. The fault lies with Paul Feig and Katie Dippold, the co-writers of the clunky script.

As for the box office, Sony predicted that it would make between $40-50 million opening weekend, and it performed as expected. Early reports on Sunday put the figure at something like $46 million. It came in second behind The Secret Life of Pets, which… let’s face it, is a massive, crowd-pleasing family film. The problem was that Ghostbusters was TOO scary for really little kids and not funny enough to have box office longevity. It cost $144 million to make Ghostbusters, and I’m sure that the film will break even and likely make the studio some money. But as many analysts pointed out, that might not be good enough. Ghostbusters didn’t need to perform at expectations, it needed to exceed expectations to be considered a “success.” You can read more analysis here.

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Did Jennifer Aniston’s late mother Nancy Dow cut Jen out of her will?

Did Jennifer Aniston’s late mother Nancy Dow cut Jen out of her will?

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Jennifer Aniston’s mother Nancy Dow passed away back in May. I actually covered it at the time because Nancy Dow was an actress at one point, and because Aniston and her mom had a very public falling out back in the 1990s. Aniston would occasionally reference her mother in interviews, giving updates about the state of their relationship. From what I remember of Aniston’s interviews over the years, she let Nancy back into her life circa 2005, but there were still significant rifts between mother and daughter. Still, Aniston apparently paid her mom’s bills, especially after Nancy’s health declined over the past five years especially. And after all of that… Nancy Dow didn’t leave her daughter anything in her will, apparently. Not only that, Nancy left her “private writings” about Jennifer to someone else, someone who will likely sell the material.

In its latest issue on newsstands now, an insider tells In Touch magazine that Jennifer Aniston’s late mom Nancy Dow, bequeathed her home, all of her money and other personal items — including scores of personal writings about Jen — to another relative. Nancy, who died at 79, “changed her will about a year ago, and no one in the family knew a thing about it,” the insider tells In Touch exclusively.

“Even though Jen and Nancy had a very strained relationship, Jen still paid almost all of Nancy’s bills in her final years,” says the insider.

Jen famously stopped talking to Nancy in 1996 after she gave an interview about her daughter to the tabloid TV show Hard Copy. Three years later, the rift widened after Nancy wrote — against Jen’s wishes — about their painful falling-out in the tell-all From Mother and Daughter to Friends: A Memoir. Instead of paying Jen back after her death, “Nancy left the relative her condo and more than a million dollars that she’d saved. She was a penny-pincher, and the alimony she received from Jen’s dad, John [Aniston], was pretty much never touched.”

Even worse, Nancy left all of her private writings to the relative. “Nancy wrote down everything about Jen, and that material is now in the hands of someone who could profit from it,” the insider tells In Touch.

[From In Touch Weekly]

If this is true – and I think it’s probably true – this should answer all of your questions about Jennifer and Nancy’s estrangement. Even in death, Nancy Dow was trying to stick it to her daughter. It’s so nasty, passive-aggressive and ridiculous, it’s almost funny in a very dark and f—ked up way. I mean, Aniston doesn’t need her mother’s money or her estate, but if Aniston was paying her mother’s bills (which I also think is true), then this is just one final screw-you from mother to daughter. How would you take it if your own mother treated you like that, up until the very end?

Photos courtesy of Getty, Fame/Flynet.

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Source Cele Bitchy