Ashley Graham: “I hit the beauty jackpot, I get it”

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On her big break and becoming a super famous model:

For 10 years I’d been told I was always going to be a catalog girl, never a cover girl. Well, I got with IMG and did five covers in a year, boom, boom, boom. See, if you have a pretty face doors will open, but your job isn’t just to walk through them, it’s to get invited back.

On the fact that she is genetically blessed, but that’s not enough:

Look, I hit the beauty jackpot, I get it, but that’s not enough, you’ve got to have more to have longevity in this business. It’s always been, “OK, so what can I do now?”

 

 

Melissa McCarthy Models Her Fall Collection

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Melissa McCarthy, who surprised her fans earlier this year with her 50 pounds weight loss, launched a clothing line a while ago and today, she is back to show us her fall collection, with cute mix and match pieces that she is modeling herself.

Melissa on her Seven7 collection that carries sizes for all:

The fun of it is you should be able to put these things together and not have to make a choice about going out to dinner or getting the sweater. Wear the sweater to dinner!

Earlier this year, Melissa shared some details about her 50 pounds weight loss:

I actually am a size 14. No trick, nothing to tell, just super boring life. You bring it real down, you don’t do anything fun and you go to bed at 7:30 — that’s the trick. (My) husband will ask, “Is it five and are you in jammies?” “I’m gonna call them loungewear.

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Introducing NEW SVC Men: First Plus-Size Male Model Zach Miko

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That’s right: from now on (as a result of many requests over the years), Skinny VS Curvy will feature, besides women and their wide range of body shapes and body image issues, MEN!

And here we are, launching our new category with the first plus-size male model – Zach Miko, who was signed a few months back with ING Models, modeled for Target and became the image of a ‘brawn’ model or the equivalent of ‘curve’ for women. Zach’s stats:

Age: 26

Height: 6ft 6in / 198cm

Waist: 40in / 102cm

On how society views men who have body image issues as un-masculine:

I always had my own body-image struggle. With men, there is still a lot of bravado and false masculinity to get through. You’re not supposed to care about how you look. If you have issues, you aren’t supposed to talk about it. It’s considered weak or un-masculine. Which is stupid. It’s about having feelings that make you human. I think, even now with the progression, you still have that 1950s male mentality of men being strong and emotionless. If it makes men realise that it’s OK to care about how you look, or even feel bad about it and want to change … I have had [body] issues all my life and that can make you insecure. You project those feelings on to others and that can damage relationships. It creates this vicious cycle. It could all be avoided if you opened up and said I do or don’t feel good about myself.

On the cause of his insecurities and trying to make people feel good about themselves:

I was between diets and trying to change the way I look for so long. As an actor, I was told by every casting director that I was too big. But I think I was trying to make other people more comfortable. I have always been a big guy, I was picked on as a kid, and that’s where it came from. We live in a society where “big” and “fat” have become insults, and “skinny”, “little” and “petite” have become compliments. We have come to correlate a negative meaning with “big” and “fat”.

On the fact that plus0sized people can be healthy:

I am a big advocate of health. I just don’t think you have to be a twig to [be healthy]. Other people don’t have a right to project an idea of unhealthy on to you if you have this extra weight. I think labeling people as unhealthy is unfair. You don’t know what their health is. People think I’m a slob and that I don’t take care of myself. But I do. For starters, I cycle every day. But you do start to internalize that [feeling].

… says Zach.

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Plus-Size Model Rosie Mercado Received Death Threats for Losing 240 lbs

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The full story from Daily Mail:

Plus-size model Rosie Mercado who shed 240lbs said she was targeted by ‘fat activists’ who told her to kill herself after her dramatic weight loss.

The mother-of-three from Las Vegas said she does not ‘miss anything’ about being 410lbs but that she has received hate mail directed at her transformed body. The 36-year-old, who used to be a size 34 and is now a 12/14, was told to ‘jump off a bridge and kill myself’ by people who objected to her weight loss, she claimed in an interview with TMZ.

I got hate mail…Not so much from the other models, just fans that hated on me. They told me to go jump off a bridge and kill myself for losing weight. Fat activists, there you go. Yeah fat activists, they just hated the thought I was really public about my weight loss and I was losing weight,’ she said.

While Rosie, who now weighs 170lbs, ‘loves’ her slimmer physique and the ‘freedom’ it has given her, she said some people reacted negatively to it.

She said: ‘Because I guess everybody loves to be happy in their own weight. Some people love being overweight, some people don’t. I think it’s a personal choice and you’ve just got to take it, there’s good and bad that comes with any life choice and changes so you know what? You’ve just got to let it go and not pay attention to the negative remarks.’

Rosie said her critics did not like her being ‘authentic and open’ about the changes to her body and her subsequent tummy tuck and skin removal.

Despite losing almost half her former body weight she said she is still plus-size, adding: ‘I love it.’

 

Ashley Graham Does Self Magazine

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At 17, Graham signed with Wilhelmina Models and moved to New York City on her own. She quickly discovered the industry’s uglier aspects—for one thing, that even within the niche of plus-size modeling, body diversity has its limits. After one agent waved a wad of cash in her face and said, “You can make a lot more of this if you lose more pounds,” her body image took a dive. Graham began trying every diet under the sun, from cabbage soup to 10-day juice fasts.

But nothing stuck. “All of a sudden, Mom wasn’t cooking for me; Mom wasn’t there being like, ‘Lets go work out!’ ” Her confidence plummeted, and so did the control she felt over her body. “I went from a size 12 to a size 18,” she says, trying to keep up with the constant partying and networking that seemed effortless to the other models and agents around her. “It was a dark place.” At the time, Graham couldn’t see herself as beautiful at a size 18, but more than that, “It was the way that I was treating my body. I didn’t understand the health aspect of it.” The former high school basketball and volleyball player stopped exercising, losing her tone and definition. Within a year of moving to New York, “I looked at myself in the mirror and said, ‘I hate you. You’re so gross,’ ” Graham recalls. “I’m looking at my cellulite and my back fat and thinking, I have to go shoot lingerie tomorrow and smile, and I am heinous. How can I get through this?”

Tim Gunn: “Have you shopped retail for size 14-plus clothing? It’s a horribly insulting and demoralizing experience”

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On how fashion doesn’t love plus-sized women:

“I love the American fashion industry, but it has a lot of problems, and one of them is the baffling way it has turned its back on plus-size women. It’s a puzzling conundrum. The average American woman now wears between a size 16 and a size 18, according to new research from Washington State University. There are 100 million plus-size women in America, and, for the past three years, they have increased their spending on clothes faster than their straight-size counterparts. There is money to be made here ($20.4 billion, up 17 percent from 2013). But many designers — dripping with disdain, lacking imagination or simply too cowardly to take a risk — still refuse to make clothes for them.”

On what designers think:

“I’ve spoken to many designers and merchandisers about this. The overwhelming response is, “I’m not interested in her.” Why? “I don’t want her wearing my clothes.” Why? “She won’t look the way that I want her to look.” They say the plus-size woman is complicated, different and difficult, that no two size 16s are alike. Some haven’t bothered to hide their contempt. “No one wants to see curvy women” on the runway, Karl Lagerfeld, head designer of Chanel, said in 2009. Plenty of mass retailers are no more enlightened: Under the tenure of chief executive Mike Jeffries, Abercrombie & Fitch sold nothing larger than a size 10, with Jeffries explaining that “we go after the attractive, all-American kid. This a design failure and not a customer issue. There is no reason larger women can’t look just as fabulous as all other women. The key is the harmonious balance of silhouette, proportion and fit, regardless of size or shape. Designs need to be reconceived, not just sized up; it’s a matter of adjusting proportions. The textile changes, every seam changes. Done right, our clothing can create an optical illusion that helps us look taller and slimmer. Done wrong, and we look worse than if we were naked.”

On the fact that it is depressing to shop while plus-sized:

“Have you shopped retail for size 14-plus clothing? Based on my experience shopping with plus-size women, it’s a horribly insulting and demoralizing experience. Half the items make the body look larger, with features like ruching, box pleats and shoulder pads. Pastels and large-scale prints and crazy pattern-mixing abound, all guaranteed to make you look infantile or like a float in a parade. Adding to this travesty is a major department-store chain that makes you walk under a marquee that reads “WOMAN.” What does that even imply? That a “woman” is anyone larger than a 12, and everyone else is a girl? It’s mind-boggling.”

On how plus-size collections are all dated:

“Despite the huge financial potential of this market, many designers don’t want to address it. It’s not in their vocabulary. Today’s designers operate within paradigms that were established decades ago, including anachronistic sizing. (Consider the fashion show: It hasn’t changed in more than a century.) But this is now the shape of women in this nation, and designers need to wrap their minds around it. I profoundly believe that women of every size can look good. But they must be given choices. Separates — tops, bottoms — rather than single items like dresses or jumpsuits always work best for the purpose of fit. Larger women look great in clothes skimming the body, rather than hugging or cascading. There’s an art to doing this. Designers, make it work.”

… says Tim.

Tess Holliday & Co at the Curve Fashion Festival

Tess Holliday & Co at the Curve Fashion Festival

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The Curve Fashion Festival, UK’s largest Plus Size Event for women over size 14, took place a few days ago and the star of the show was no other than size 22 (?) Tess Holliday, who rocked the runway in a striped dress, followed by a variety of plus-sized models wearing the season’s latest trends.

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More models from the Curve Festival next!

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Read the rest of Tess Holliday & Co at the Curve Fashion Festival (0 words)


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