Ariel Winter: “I developed these boobs and butt & I started getting all this hate”

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Ariel Winter recently opened up about her journey in front of the critical eyes of her haters, who, since she developed ‘boobs and butt’, started to attack her constantly:

Ariel Winter started out in Hollywood at just 11 years old. Naturally, as she got older, her body matured — and that, unfortunately, is where the Internet got ugly. “I was called every name in the book: fat, a slut, trashy, ugly,” she tells Stylish. But she’s not tolerating that talk anymore. She’s fighting back — and educating young girls in the process.

Right after I started developing, I automatically started getting all this hate. I developed these boobs and butt, and everything changed,” the Modern Family actress, 18, tells Stylish. “And as I got older, it only seemed to get worse.”

That’s why she decided to partner with Dove on its 12-year-old confidence campaign, the Self Esteem Project, which aims to inspire girls through research, education and understanding of their bodies. “What I think is really amazing about it is that we’re empowering young women to love themselves, to be comfortable with themselves,” she says. “And it’s not just about [liking] what they look like, but loving who they are.”

The Sofia the First star notes that 62 percent of young girls don’t know how to use the Internet to get the information that could help them understand that when it comes to bodies, each one is unique, and there’s no such thing as “right” or “wrong.” “We’re teaching them … so we can change the scape, so they don’t have to grow up the way I did,” Winter explains.

“I read a lot of the stories young women will send me about their body positivity and their body journeys, and that really helps me,” she says. “There are a lot of young women who are going through the same thing that I went through, and I think it’s important that we all empower each other. It makes it easier.”

 

Demi Lovato: “I don’t see anybody in any sort of squad that has a normal body”

Demi Lovato: “I don’t see anybody in any sort of squad that has a normal body”

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Demi Lovato recently opened up to Glamour Magazine about body image, the lack of normal bodies in Taylor Swift’s squad and feminism:

On the negative response to her “Body Say” images:

You don’t say anything, because you can never win. Whether they’re saying that you’re ugly, or that you’re a whore, or that you’re a bad role model, or something else, you’re never gonna win.

On exploring sexuality in her image and music:

We live in an imbalanced society when it comes to encouraging male sexuality and discouraging female sexuality. In 20 years I hope we’ll look back like, Wow, that’s how it used to be.

Question: You’ve said before, in regard to Taylor Swift, “Don’t brand yourself a feminist if you don’t do the work.” How do you see yourself doing the work?

Just speaking out. I’m not afraid to talk about the fact that women get paid less than men in the United States and how unfair that is. Talking about it at all is doing the work. And I think every woman does her part in some way. But I think in certain situations, certain people could be doing more if they’re going to claim that as part of their brand. To be honest, and this will probably get me in trouble, I don’t see anybody in any sort of squad that has a normal body. It’s kind of this false image of what people should look like. And what they should be like, and it’s not real.

Question: Well, there are many kinds of “normal” bodies. I think what you’re getting at is there’s just one type of body in that squad.

It’s not realistic. And I think that having a song and a video about tearing Katy Perry down, that’s not women’s empowerment. We all do things that aren’t, but I have to ask myself, Am I content with calling myself a feminist? Yes, because I speak out.

Question: Do things besides a busy schedule still trigger you?

Yeah, of course. Seeing cocaine in movies. I’ve never watched The Wolf of Wall Street. I can’t. I don’t like to go out to clubs, because I find myself seeing remnants of drugs in the bathroom. I did the Victoria’s Secret Swim Special, and being surrounded by supermodels’ bodies was triggering to me. I remember asking, “How do you maintain your figure?” Some said, “I really have to work at it.” Others said, “It’s genetics.” It was interesting to hear that it wasn’t through unhealthy [behaviors]. It was a great learning experience. I still felt sexy, having a different body than these women. I had Wilmer there, who loved my curves—that helped.

Taylor Swift’s squad that lacks normal bodies, according to Demi:

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Tracy Anderson’s Words, Then & Now

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THEN – Tracy on walking as exercise in April 2016:

We are wrapped in bubble wrap. We think that making it through the pain cave is putting our workout gear on and getting to class. Now, I’m not knocking any level of showing up, but I think many people are stuck in preschool with their bodies. Going for a walk is like going to preschool—but you could go to college, you could get your master’s degree.

NOW – Tracy on walking as exercise in September 2016:

I always approve walking as a really great cardiovascular workout to do. It’s something that people think is for the aging crowd or that it’s not really aggressive enough, and I completely disagree with that. It’s a really responsible form of exercise. One of the great things about walking is that it’s something that almost everybody can do. It’s something that is very healthy because it doesn’t have harsh impact on your joints. And even though you are doing the same movement over and over, you can change your speed, you can change your stride, you can change all different things to keep yourself engaged. You burn less calories running than walking if you aren’t able to run for very long or run very well. To really be effective and calorie-burning, you have to be able to work your body to where it’s working up a sweat, where it’s pushing into that zone of actually being optimized to be effective in the calorie-burning range, so it’s much better to go for a long and powerful walk than it is to go for a short run.

 

(more…)

Chloë Grace Moretz to Young Girl: “You’re enough”

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Her message to young women:

This year especially, I had to realize that it’s OK to ask for help— it’s OK to not know. As a young woman you feel like you really need to have everything figured out—but it’s all right to say, ‘I don’t know. I have absolutely no idea.’ Keep good people around you because positivity begets positivity. I learned that the hard way. Just try to keep your head above the water and don’t get caught up in all the trash. I think another thing that is really helpful for young women to understand is that you’re enough. You don’t need that dress, you don’t need that compliment, you don’t need that post on social media. You, within yourself, are enough. And, finally, don’t underestimate the power of friendship.

… says Chloe in Teen Vogue.

 

Emily Ratajkowski: ‘Wanting attention is genderless. It’s human’

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On the fact that people call her an ‘attention whore’:

“It’s absurd to think that desire for attention doesn’t drive both women and men. Why are women scrutinized for it more, then? And if a woman dresses up because she does want attention, male or otherwise, does that make her guilty of something? Or less “serious”? Our society doesn’t question men’s motivations for taking their shirt off, or shaving, or talking about politics—nor should it. Wanting attention is genderless. It’s human.

“Often it’s men propelling these acts of sexism, but women discount one another too: Think about how many times you’ve heard a woman say about another woman, ‘Oh, she’s just doing that for attention.’ We’ve internalized this trope. Our society tells women we can’t be, say, sexy and confident and opinionated about politics. This would allow us too much power. Instead our society asks us to declare and defend our motivations, which makes us second-guess them, all while men do what they please without question… The truth is that both groups want to be noticed. Yet we view a man’s desire for attention as a natural instinct; with a woman, we label her a narcissist.”

… says Emily in Glamour.

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Alicia Keys on Going Makeup-Free: “In a lot of ways I’m sick of it”

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On choosing to go makeup-free at different red carpet events this year:

Really empowering. Really freeing. The thing is, it really came from because we put so many limitations on ourselves, on each other. Society puts limitations on it. In a lot of ways I’m sick of it. I’m over it to be honest. That’s a lot of what the music is about. It’s about being our own unique selves. We each have something that no one else has. It would be so amazing to just embrace each other how we are.

… says 35 year-old Alicia.

 

Renee Zellweger: “Why do we value beauty over contribution?”

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On how women are valued for their looks instead of their accomplishments:

I’ve never seen the maturation of a woman as a negative thing. I’ve never seen a woman stepping into her more powerful self as a negative. But this conversation perpetuates the problem. Why are we talking about how women look? Why do we value beauty over contribution? We don’t seem to value beauty over contribution for men. It’s simply not a conversation.