Jillian Michaels: “When you care more you train harder and eat better”

Redbook_JAN_Jillian-Michaels_edited-1-768x1024 - Jillian Michaels: "When you care more you train harder and eat better"

On why she’s so committed to working out and being healthy:

I’m a 42-year-old. I still like skinny jeans. I still prefer a two-piece instead of a one-piece, but now I have two young kids. So for me, I want to be skiing down the mountain alongside my kids instead of waiting at the bottom for them. I want to see their children graduate from college. I want to meet my grandchildren’s children. These are my whys.

On aging and why she’s in better shape now than she was in her 20s:

I care more, and when you care more you train harder and eat better. People believe that aging is this slow descent into decrepitude. That’s not true. When people say, “Oh, I’m 40 now, and this is happening to me and that’s happening to me,” it’s the cumulative effect of years of neglect, which—by the way—can still be turned around.

On why she thinks there’s too much pressure on women to get back to their pre-pregnancy bodies:

I was just talking to someone who was breast-feeding and already on a diet. I was like, “Dude, you’ve got to chill. If you start dropping more than two pounds a week, you’re going to compromise your milk supply.” The reality is that you can bounce back better than ever, but time frames vary for everyone. Everybody and every pregnancy is different. If it takes you a year, who cares?

 

(more…)

Keira Knightley Does Harper’s Bazaar

skinniest-days - Keira Knightley Does Harper's Bazaar

Long-time-no-see Keira Knightley is the cover girl off the December issue of Harper’s Bazaar – and inside, the gorgeous actress talks about becoming a mom and how her priorities changed compared to her skinniest days.

On the way pregnancy changed her body and changing her perspective:

“It’s a different body, as it should be, because it’s done an extraordinary thing…I thought I was going to go, “God, I’ve got to get back into shape.” I actually went completely the opposite. I went, “F**k that, I’m not putting that pressure on myself in any way.” So it’s taken me a long time to get back into my jeans. I’m nearly there. Not quite there, but nearly there…”

… says 31 year-old Keira, who gave birth to her first child, daughter Edie in May last year.

Step Back in Time: Keira in her skinniest days back in 2016:

skinniest-days-6 - Keira Knightley Does Harper's Bazaar

 

Introducing NEW SVC Men: First Plus-Size Male Model Zach Miko

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That’s right: from now on (as a result of many requests over the years), Skinny VS Curvy will feature, besides women and their wide range of body shapes and body image issues, MEN!

And here we are, launching our new category with the first plus-size male model – Zach Miko, who was signed a few months back with ING Models, modeled for Target and became the image of a ‘brawn’ model or the equivalent of ‘curve’ for women. Zach’s stats:

Age: 26

Height: 6ft 6in / 198cm

Waist: 40in / 102cm

On how society views men who have body image issues as un-masculine:

I always had my own body-image struggle. With men, there is still a lot of bravado and false masculinity to get through. You’re not supposed to care about how you look. If you have issues, you aren’t supposed to talk about it. It’s considered weak or un-masculine. Which is stupid. It’s about having feelings that make you human. I think, even now with the progression, you still have that 1950s male mentality of men being strong and emotionless. If it makes men realise that it’s OK to care about how you look, or even feel bad about it and want to change … I have had [body] issues all my life and that can make you insecure. You project those feelings on to others and that can damage relationships. It creates this vicious cycle. It could all be avoided if you opened up and said I do or don’t feel good about myself.

On the cause of his insecurities and trying to make people feel good about themselves:

I was between diets and trying to change the way I look for so long. As an actor, I was told by every casting director that I was too big. But I think I was trying to make other people more comfortable. I have always been a big guy, I was picked on as a kid, and that’s where it came from. We live in a society where “big” and “fat” have become insults, and “skinny”, “little” and “petite” have become compliments. We have come to correlate a negative meaning with “big” and “fat”.

On the fact that plus0sized people can be healthy:

I am a big advocate of health. I just don’t think you have to be a twig to [be healthy]. Other people don’t have a right to project an idea of unhealthy on to you if you have this extra weight. I think labeling people as unhealthy is unfair. You don’t know what their health is. People think I’m a slob and that I don’t take care of myself. But I do. For starters, I cycle every day. But you do start to internalize that [feeling].

… says Zach.

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Celebrity Instagram Roundup October 10-16

Celebrity Instagram Roundup October 10-16

Take a look at what your favorite celebs have been up to this past week!


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Lea Michele: “I get a lot of compliments on my legs, which is funny for a short girl”

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On why the scale doesn’t determine her self-worth:

“As I get older, my body is always changing. Right now I have so much energy, my skin looks good, and my butt is higher than it’s ever been. I’ve been skinnier and I’ve been a little bit bigger, and I’m never hard on myself one way or the other. The fact that I’m active, eating well, and taking care of myself is all that matters—not a number.”

On why she loves her shape:

“I love my shape because it’s unique to me. I’m 5’2”, and I get a lot of compliments on my legs, which is funny for a short girl. But they’re one of my favorite things about my body.”

On learning to listen to her body:

“If I have one of those days when I don’t want to work out, I ask myself why. I’ve learned how to listen to my body and know what I need in that moment. And I’m grateful for that. It took me a very long time to get to this place. Now I can tell when my body is saying to take a break from working out, or when it’s saying, No, you’re being a little lazy, so that I can push myself to get going.”

On what she eats:

“I was vegan for a while, I was vegetarian for 10 years, and now I’ve incorporated meat back into my diet. I eat as healthy as possible because I know food fuels me. I usually start my day with avocado toast or a green smoothie. I love a big salad for lunch; I’m always concocting recipes like kale Caesar or spinach artichoke salad. For dinner I’m flexible. If I’m going out and I want a bowl of pasta, I’ll eat it. I’m not hard on myself.”

… says Lea in Shape.

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Tim Gunn: “Have you shopped retail for size 14-plus clothing? It’s a horribly insulting and demoralizing experience”

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On how fashion doesn’t love plus-sized women:

“I love the American fashion industry, but it has a lot of problems, and one of them is the baffling way it has turned its back on plus-size women. It’s a puzzling conundrum. The average American woman now wears between a size 16 and a size 18, according to new research from Washington State University. There are 100 million plus-size women in America, and, for the past three years, they have increased their spending on clothes faster than their straight-size counterparts. There is money to be made here ($20.4 billion, up 17 percent from 2013). But many designers — dripping with disdain, lacking imagination or simply too cowardly to take a risk — still refuse to make clothes for them.”

On what designers think:

“I’ve spoken to many designers and merchandisers about this. The overwhelming response is, “I’m not interested in her.” Why? “I don’t want her wearing my clothes.” Why? “She won’t look the way that I want her to look.” They say the plus-size woman is complicated, different and difficult, that no two size 16s are alike. Some haven’t bothered to hide their contempt. “No one wants to see curvy women” on the runway, Karl Lagerfeld, head designer of Chanel, said in 2009. Plenty of mass retailers are no more enlightened: Under the tenure of chief executive Mike Jeffries, Abercrombie & Fitch sold nothing larger than a size 10, with Jeffries explaining that “we go after the attractive, all-American kid. This a design failure and not a customer issue. There is no reason larger women can’t look just as fabulous as all other women. The key is the harmonious balance of silhouette, proportion and fit, regardless of size or shape. Designs need to be reconceived, not just sized up; it’s a matter of adjusting proportions. The textile changes, every seam changes. Done right, our clothing can create an optical illusion that helps us look taller and slimmer. Done wrong, and we look worse than if we were naked.”

On the fact that it is depressing to shop while plus-sized:

“Have you shopped retail for size 14-plus clothing? Based on my experience shopping with plus-size women, it’s a horribly insulting and demoralizing experience. Half the items make the body look larger, with features like ruching, box pleats and shoulder pads. Pastels and large-scale prints and crazy pattern-mixing abound, all guaranteed to make you look infantile or like a float in a parade. Adding to this travesty is a major department-store chain that makes you walk under a marquee that reads “WOMAN.” What does that even imply? That a “woman” is anyone larger than a 12, and everyone else is a girl? It’s mind-boggling.”

On how plus-size collections are all dated:

“Despite the huge financial potential of this market, many designers don’t want to address it. It’s not in their vocabulary. Today’s designers operate within paradigms that were established decades ago, including anachronistic sizing. (Consider the fashion show: It hasn’t changed in more than a century.) But this is now the shape of women in this nation, and designers need to wrap their minds around it. I profoundly believe that women of every size can look good. But they must be given choices. Separates — tops, bottoms — rather than single items like dresses or jumpsuits always work best for the purpose of fit. Larger women look great in clothes skimming the body, rather than hugging or cascading. There’s an art to doing this. Designers, make it work.”

… says Tim.

Jessica Alba Does Shape

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On the worst part of working out:

“I don’t like the smell of scalp sweat. Ugh!”

On skipping workouts:

“If I work out four times, I consider it a successful week. But it’s typically more like two to three days a week because that’s what I have time for. I take Spin or hot yoga classes in the morning, and I sacrifice sleep to fit them in. For me, the benefits of exercise are more mental than physical. Working out takes away that little edge so that I feel happier and more productive and my brain can get kick-started.”

On the right food:

“With exercise, I get a little more toned and I definitely feel stronger, but my diet is much more important if I’m trying to slim down. In that case, I usually don’t eat gluten, dairy, fried foods or processed foods. I try to stick to a diet that’s low in sugar and carbs and high in lean protein and vegetables.”

On her indulgences:

“I’m not big on carbs, but…some of my Honest colleagues and I just ate like a gallon of popcorn! Also, while I don’t usually have dessert, I do really like strawberry shortcake. I mean I really, really like it.”

… says Jessica.